Why do British say Idear instead of idea?

The short answer is that the addition of an “r” sound at the end of a word like “soda” or “idea” is a regionalism and isn’t considered a mispronunciation. Here’s the story. In English words spelled with “r,” the consonant used to be fully pronounced everywhere.

Why do British people say idea as Idear?

The word idear seems to be singled out for hypercorrection. My hypothesis about this is that the phrase “idea of” occurs so often in English that people with non-rhotic accents are used to pronouncing an ‘r’ at the end of idea, because there is an intusive ‘r’ in the phrase “idea(r) of”.

Why do Brits say ER instead of a?

The reason it feels wrong to say them that way, is because it is wrong to say them that way. British people do not read er and erm in the way that Americans would read those words, with a fully articulated r. Most British dialects are non-rhotic; the r is not pronounced in words like her or term.

Why do New Yorkers add an R?

In the past, the silent “r” was considered a sign of immigrants or the lower class, therefore, it was stigmatized. While still popular, the number of New Yorkers that drop the “r” is dwindling. The intrusive “r” is a different phenomenon where the consonant attaches itself onto words that normally don’t include it.

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Where do they say Warsh instead of wash?

The accent can be found in the swath of the country that extends west from Washington, taking in Maryland; southern Pennsylvania; West Virginia; parts of Virginia; southern Ohio, Indiana and Illinois; most of Missouri; and Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, much of Kansas and west Texas.

Why do British say R after a?

The short answer is that the addition of an “r” sound at the end of a word like “soda” or “idea” is a regionalism and isn’t considered a mispronunciation. Here’s the story. In English words spelled with “r,” the consonant used to be fully pronounced everywhere.

Why do British Add R after a?

Where words like saw and idea come before a vowel, there’s an increasing tendency among speakers of British English to insert an ‘r’ sound, so that law and order becomes law-r and order and china animals becomes china-r animals. Linguists call this ‘intrusive r’ because the ‘r’ was never historically part of the word.

Why do Scots say ERM?

“Erm” is used because it presumes a non-rhotic accent, and it really does sound like “um”, which is how Americans would tend to spell the same sound. In the same way, “er” is pretty much the same thing as “uh”.

What does Idear mean in English?

noun. any conception existing in the mind as a result of mental understanding, awareness, or activity. a thought, conception, or notion: That is an excellent idea. an impression: He gave me a general idea of how he plans to run the department.

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Is Idear a real word?

1 : a thought or plan about what to do Surprising her was a bad idea. 2 : something imagined or pictured in the mind I had an idea of what the town was like. 3 : an understanding of something I have no idea what you mean.

What is the meaning of Idear?

[ideˈar] Full verb table transitive verb. imaginar) to imagine , think up.

Is Warsh a real word?

A listener named Matt wants to know why some speakers of American English pronounce the word “wash” as “warsh.” This pronunciation is sometimes called the “intrusive R,” and like our recent episode on the “pin”/“pen” merger and “cot”/“caught” merger, this question has to do with dialects of American English.

What accent adds an R?

This is a largely American peculiarity whereby someone with a traditionally non-rhotic accent (as found in New York City and New England) hypercorrects and pronounces r regardless of whether it precedes a vowel.

Do Australians pronounce the r?

The Australian accent is for the most part non-rhotic. This means that the pronunciation of the /r/ sound will never occur at the end of words. … As a result you may be able to hear the /r/ sound falling between these two words (and others) sometimes even though there is no “r” letter present : saw it /sɔːrət/.